Collaboration Tools in Microsoft Word

Did you know that Microsoft Word has built-in collaboration tools? 

Word supports real-time chat and co-editing of documents online. Ready to start?  All you need is Microsoft OneDrive and Word 2016

Follow these steps:

  1. Save your document to OneDrive.
  2. Open your document in Word.
  3. Select Share on the ribbon (top right).
  4. Choose a contact to collaborate with by entering a name, email address, or searching your address book.
  5. Can edit permissions will be selected automatically in the drop-down. If desired, change to Can view instead.
  6. Add a message (optional).
  7. Click Share.

The “share” navigation pane in Word will display who owns the document, who can edit the document, and who can view the document.

On the receiving end, the person invited to edit your document will receive an email with the subject line, “I shared [name of document] with you in OneDrive.”  (A piece of advice: we live in an age of malware, so let your collaborator know the document is coming.)

Co-editing in Word

After you share your document, you can collaborate on that file at the same time with others.  Microsoft recommends working together in Word Online to see real-time changes. Colored flags will show you exactly where in the document each person is working.

Color flag in Word Online as you co-edit

Chat in Word

When editing together online, select Chat to open a chat window.  Type your message and press Enter to send.

Chat history is not saved when you close a document.  If the chat conversations are important, use copy and paste to preserve them: click in the Chat box, hit <Ctrl A> to select all, followed by <Ctrl C> to copy.  Open a new Word Document, paste the chat history using <Ctrl V>, save, and close.

Using Chat vs. Comments

Microsoft suggests using Chat when you want to communicate with others immediately, for example, to ask a quick question or divide sections among the co-editors.

Use Comments (on the Review tab on the ribbon) when you want to attach a comment to a specific selection within the document, such as when you need to ask if a word or phrase should be changed. Comments are saved with the document and can be replied to, marked as done or deleted.

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

Track changes: Display for review options (Word 2010 and 2013)

Track changes can be incredibly useful or drive you batty if you don’t understand option settings. Get smart by following CompuSavvy’s helpful hints.

CompuSavvy's Word & WordPerfect Tips

People who use Track Changes sometimes find the Display for Review options confusing.  For one thing, some users don’t realize that changing the Display for Review option to “Final” (or, in Word 2013, “No Markup”) doesn’t actually remove the revision marks – for insertions, deletions, formatting changes, moves, etc. – from the document.  Rather, it merely lets you preview the document as it would look if you accepted all of the changes.[1]

For another thing, the wording of the options isn’t particularly easy to understand.  And the wording has changed between Word 2010 and Word 2013, but remains somewhat obscure.

This post is intended to help clarify the various Display for Review options available in Word 2010 and Word 2013.

Display for Review Options in Word 2010

In Word 2010, the Display for Review options are as follows:

Original

This option shows the document as it appeared before any insertions, deletions, moves…

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