Last Call: Practical Time Management CLE

Learn how to take control of your workload, manage your busy schedule, focus on your priorities, and make your workday more productive by attending Practical Time Management tomorrow!

To Register

Select this link, click on the image above, or visit the Upcoming CLE page. Secure payment processing powered by Eventbrite. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express accepted. Program materials included in the $25 registration price.

Date – Time – Location

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Pacific Time. This is a live, online webinar.

Program topics will include

Employing strategies to better manage time
Respecting the 80/20 rule, creating a daily plan, allowing buffer time, protecting your productivity, becoming a better estimator of billable work, staying on course with countdowns and weekly reviews, and more.

Coping with an overwhelming workload
Pausing new clients, scheduling a “catch up” day, letting go of non-critical projects, renegotiating deadlines, firing difficult clients, delegating, and outsourcing.

Overcoming procrastination
Selecting where and how to start, getting motivated, experimenting with Pomodoro and the Power of 3, clearing the clutter, managing big projects, and overcoming distractions.

Deploying organizational solutions
Implementing client policies, automating forms and workflows, creating checklists, investing in practice management software, optimizing email and text messaging, and considering apps designed to boost focus and rescue billable time.

Who should attend?

Lawyers, office administrators, legal staff – anyone interested in improving organizational and time management skills.

Group Discounts

Discounts are available to firms who wish to register 5 or more attendees. Contact beverly@oregonlawpracticemanagement.org prior to registering.

Questions & Live Polling

Questions are welcome during the live event. Attendees are also encouraged to participate in live, anonymous polling.

Can’t Attend?

Video and audio recordings will be available to download along with the program materials shortly after the live program event.  Price: $25. Contact me or visit my online CLE store to place an order.

Register now!

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis

 

Practical Time Management

Learn how to take control of your workload, manage your busy schedule, focus on your priorities, and make your workday more productive by attending Practical Time Management on March 13, 2019.

To Register

Click hereclick on the image above, or visit the Upcoming CLE page. Secure payment processing powered by Eventbrite. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express accepted. Program materials included in the $25 registration price.

Date – Time – Location

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Pacific Time. This is a live, online webinar.

Who should attend?

Lawyers, office administrators, legal staff – anyone interested in improving organizational and time management skills.

Group Discounts

Discounts are available to firms who wish to register 5 or more attendees. Contact beverly@oregonlawpracticemanagement.org prior to registering.

Questions & Live Polling

Questions are welcome during the live event. Attendees are also encouraged to participate in live, anonymous polling.

Can’t Attend?

Video and audio recordings will be available to download along with the program materials shortly after the live program event.  Price: $25. Contact me or visit my online CLE store to place an order.

Program topics will include

Employing strategies to better manage time
Respecting the 80/20 rule, creating a daily plan, allowing buffer time, protecting your productivity, becoming a better estimator of billable work, staying on course with countdowns and weekly reviews, and more.

Coping with an overwhelming workload
Pausing new clients, scheduling a “catch up” day, letting go of non-critical projects, renegotiating deadlines, firing difficult clients, delegating, and outsourcing.

Overcoming procrastination
Selecting where and how to start, getting motivated, experimenting with Pomodoro and the Power of 3, clearing the clutter, managing big projects, and overcoming distractions.

Deploying organizational solutions
Implementing client policies, automating forms and workflows, creating checklists, investing in practice management software, optimizing email and text messaging, and considering apps designed to boost focus and rescue billable time.

Register now!

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis

 

Regain Control in 2019

Is it really possible to change your work habits?

Absolutely! The new year offers each of us the chance to make changes. Not by setting lofty goals, but by committing to small adjustments that can make a big difference in attitude, health, and resilience.

Cut your work hours

Several years ago I reported on a study from the Annals of Internal Medicine that found people “who work an average of 11 or more hours per day have a 67 percent higher risk of suffering a heart attack or dying from heart disease than people who work a standard seven- to eight-hour day.  Those who work between 10 and 11 hours per day have a 45 percent higher risk.”

Your micro goal: Commit to a 9 hour (or less) work day. The occasional exception is fine, just don’t backslide.

Stand, move, stretch

Sitting in your chair for hours on end shouldn’t be the norm. Stand, move, stretch. Consider a treadmill or standing desk. Better yet, leave the office for a few minutes and walk around the block! Your joints and muscles will thank you.

Your micro goal: Move at least once an hour. Use a cheap timer, an app, recurring task reminders, or whatever it takes to remind yourself to get up. No one will care if you stretch during a deposition or walk to the back of the room during a CLE.

Say no

Find it hard to turn people away? You aren’t alone. I don’t really have a choice. I need the money. Family, friends, or former clients are depending on me. These are things we tell ourselves. Follow this advice to turn the tide.

Your micro goal: Say no at least once a month. As you gain confidence, don’t hesitate to say no whenever necessary.

Cull the herd

Too much to do and not enough time? Cull the herd.

  • Review your current client list for matters you regret taking.  If feasible, say goodbye to those clients.
  • Farm out work or delegate to others in your firm. If you’re a solo/small firm practitioner, reach out to colleagues for referrals to a contract lawyer who can get you over the hump.

Your micro goal: Apply your newfound client/case criteria to future matters and screen out cases that aren’t a good match for you.

Protect your priorities

What do you want to get done? What are your priorities? When is the last time you even thought about what you wanted?

It’s easy to get pushed around by interruptions: phone calls, texts, emails, pop-in clients, or colleagues.

Your micro goal: Block out time on your calendar for work you want to get done. Treat this time as if it were a client appointment. (No interruptions allowed.) Stay off the Internet unless the task at hand involves being on the Internet. Give the matter your undivided attention.

Put your calendar first

If your calendar contains your personal and business commitments, including time blocks to get work done, let it determine the scheduling for all new promises.

Your micro goal: Check your calendar before promising completion of a time-related task. If there is no “deadline” per se, determine when you can reasonably fit the new project into your schedule. Add it to your calendar and back it up with a task reminder. You gain nothing by promising a quick turnaround if you can’t keep your word.

Triage

If you’re in a pickle – a deadline is approaching and you know you can’t meet it  – the best approach is to face it head on. I know this can be hard. We assume clients or other lawyers will yell at us. The truth is, people are more understanding than we give them credit for. Everyone has been there. They get it.

Your micro goal: Renegotiate deadlines you can’t meet.

You can start over and you can make changes. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

All Rights Reserved Beverly Michaelis 2019

 

A Year’s Worth of Advice About YOU

As we wind down the year, it’s time to reflect back on 2018. Whatever your concerns, questions, or issues may have been, the answers could be here – if we’re lucky. Because this is the year of YOU. Your well-being. How you manage stress, respond to rotten clients, or cope with law school debt.

Everyone needs a pressure relief valve. Find yours.

Maybe it lies in learning how to say no, deploying strategies to take back your schedule, or finding time to get away from the office for a while. Each of these play a role in work-life balance and your well-being.

Peruse this list. It only takes 24 seconds – I should know, I timed it. What speaks to you?

Not sure how to start? These folks provide free and confidential help.

 

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

Postscript

For those who are looking for an “end of year” review touching on eCourt, eService, finances, technology, and workflow – see my post on December 31.

You Need a Break

Memorial Day is right around the corner.  While you’re honoring our military men and women and taking time to relax over the three-day weekend, I want you to start planning your summer vacation.  Yes, I just said that.

Build time off into your work schedule now – no excuses!  It takes effort and organization, but your body and mind will thank you.  We all need true recuperative time away and three days just isn’t enough.  Here’s a game plan to help you get started:

Budget now to go on vacation later.

“If I’m not at the office, I can’t bill.  If I can’t bill, I won’t get paid.”  True enough, but there is a solution:  budget for your vacation.  A bit of research and number crunching is in order here. First, calculate your vacation expenses. This should be relatively easy.  Next, quantify the lost revenue you need to replace during your time out of the office.  Now that you know how much you need, begin setting aside funds every week to meet your financial goal.  If necessary, find little ways to cut back that can really add up: like bringing your lunch to work, deferring your daily Starbucks fix, using public transportation, or telecommuting.  Saving weekly will keep you on track and help manage expectations. If you’re just getting started, then your plans this year may be more modest.  Next year, you can begin saving for your summer vacation in January.

Clients are important enough to schedule.  So is your vacation.

Work will never go away, but I guarantee that if you look ahead in your calendar you will find a block of time with no commitments.  Even if you haven’t made plans yet, block the time out now before your calendar fills up.  If you have a habit of backsliding, enlist your family as enforcers.  This time should be sacred.  If you need an extra incentive, consider non-refundable travel reservations.

Preparation is Key!

If you’re a member of a firm, going on vacation is a matter of meeting with other lawyers who will be covering cases during your absence.

If you are a sole practitioner, use the buddy system.  Find a colleague who is experienced in your practice area and willing to cover for you.

This arrangement is usually reciprocal and is helpful if you have an unexpected absence from the office due to injury or a medical condition.

Follow this checklist:

  • Notify clients, opposing counsel, judges, or other appropriate parties that you will be out of the office;
  • Prep your files.  They should be well-organized and current, with status memos so your buddy can easily step in if needed;
  • Create a “Countdown Schedule.”  Identify what needs to be done when and whether certain tasks can wait until your return;
  • Allow for wind down.  As your vacation approaches, leave time in your schedule to finish up last minute work.  Reduce or refer out new matters;
  • Train staff.  Do they have a clear understanding of office procedures?  How will they screen client calls during your absence?  Give them parameters for contacting you or your buddy in the event of an emergency.
  • Resist constantly checking voice mail, e-mail, or text messages.  Technology is a God-send, but part of rejuvenation is taking a break from our instant Internet society. Checking in is okay, but stick to a schedule to avoid obsessing over what is going on back at the office.  Remember – you have an emergency plan in place.  If something happens, staff or your buddy will get a hold of you.
  • Avoid post-vacation overload.  Just as you blocked out dates to go on vacation, allow yourself time to get back up-to-speed.  Otherwise, you’re right back where you started.

Give yourself and your family a well-deserved break.  With a bit of organization, you can budget for (and enjoy) your time off.  Thank you for tolerating my nagging!

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

Postscript

As we speak, I am planning my escape now!