Creative Legal Marketing Ideas – Part 4

Our final installment on marketing during COVID-19 comes courtesy of Nifty Marketing. Review these suggestions and choose three that appeal to you. Set aside times in your calendar to implement each idea. Copy and paste the details or link from the original post to refresh your memory when the appointment day arrives.

Commitment

Committing to a calendar date increases the chance you will actually follow through. This is critical because our first instinct in a crisis is to ignore marketing altogether. Unfortunately this isn’t a realistic long-term strategy. Eventually you will run out of work. Better to jump start the process now of reaching out to potential new clients.

Taking Action

Speaking of taking action – if you haven’t embraced specifics from any prior post this month, then schedule time to do so. Make time on your calendar to skim through the ideas again. Pick three that make sense for your practice and schedule out implementation dates.

Regaining Control

By committing to six marketing ideas – three from today’s post and three from prior posts – you are taking back the future of your practice. Action produces results. It spurs on more action, and we feel better for it.

Today’s Marketing Ideas

  • Figure out ways to give back
  • Serve when possible
  • Learn how to be a storyteller and share via videos
  • Utilize your Google posts feed
  • Localize your Google My Business (GMB) page
  • Update your GMB hours of operation
  • Help other attorneys
  • Create a Facebook ad

Read about the details here. Don’t forget to copy and paste the relevant text (or the link) into your calendar when you create an implementation appointment.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

Westlaw’s New Search Tool – The Carat ^

From our friend The Researching Paralegal, a great legal research tip!

Westlaw has added an important search term, the carat (^) (shift 6 on your keyboard). This allows you to put more emphasis on a search term. To use it, place the carat symbol right behind the term you want emphasized.

Here is a further explanation from Cleveland Marshall College of Law Library Blog:

You can use the caret in the main search box or in Search Within Results. An example of a search is:

liability /p (park^ or recreation or camp!)

This would place the emphasis on the term “park” and your results will be somewhat different if you run the search with or without the caret.

You can read more about Search Term Emphasis in the Search Tips document that you’ll find linked to the right of the main search box in Westlaw.

Find the caret symbol above the 6 key on a standard qwerty keyboard. Not to be confused with the carrot.

As The Researching Paralegal reminds us – If you need a refresher on Westlaw Edge, check this out:

Westlaw’s Guide to Law Review Research.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

How COVID-19 Will Change Solo and Mid-Size Law Firms

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A recent report by Clio assessing the impacts of the coronavirus on the legal industry and consumers found that the virus has created a 40 percent drop in the number of new legal matters opened per week. Almost half of the polled consumers said that if they had a legal issue, they would delay seeking legal help until after the virus subsided. Further, 22 percent of consumers indicated they were under the impression that attorneys stopped working altogether because of COVID-19.

From our friends at NW Sidebar.

This post focuses on how COVID-19 is likely to affect small to mid-size law firms. I encourage you to read the full post. Here are some key points of interest:

Life is different and also the same. Clients expect you to cater to their needs. Put yourself in their shoes and you will do well.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

 

Training Staff in Small Bites

Getting someone’s attention is tough. Keeping it is even tougher. So why not adapt?

When setting up a training program for staff, offer content that is easily digestible:

  • Choose a theme
  • Set a training period
  • Collect content
  • Divide the content into segments
  • Keep each segment short and limited to one topic

For example, you could designate July as “security” month and distribute brief training segments every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Choosing a strong password, avoiding phishing scams, and working remotely could be your first three topics.

Why This Approach?

I’ve been training lawyers and staff for decades. We belong to a profession that values continuing education, but we’re also busy and under pressure. When you distill information it is easier to absorb. Keeping it short means the listener or reader can get what they need and move on with their day.

Where Can I Find Content?

Look to your favorite law blogs. Besides yours truly, Attorney at Work, Lawyerist, and others listed by the ABA Journal are a good start.

Law Practice Today is another great resource. They do themed issues, which makes finding relevant content easier. Access the archives here.

Also see Law Technology Today. Specifically their videos and “quick tips.”

Depending on the topics you wish to address, bar and other professional publications can be helpful too.

Get Staff Involved

While you undoubtedly have some topics in mind, be sure to illicit ideas from staff. What would they like to see covered? Know more about? Ask for their tips or delegate content research to spread the load. Training doesn’t have to be a one-person act.

All rights reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis.