MCLE Changes Coming

At its June/July 2018 board meetings the OSB Board of Governors voted to recommend a requirement for MCLE on mental health and substance use issues. The overall number of MCLE credits required in each reporting period will not change, as the proposed rule includes a reduction in general/practical skills requirements.

Why require education on substance abuse?

The pressure and stress inherent in the legal profession begins in law school and never fades away:

  • Lawyers are almost twice as likely to struggle with alcohol abuse when compared to the general population
  • In a 2016 study more than 1 in 5 lawyers reported that they felt that their use of alcohol or other drugs was problematic at some point in their lives
  • In the same study nearly 3 of 4 reported that their problematic use started after they joined law school.

Source: Indra Cidambi, M.D., “Drug and Alcohol Abuse in the Legal Profession: Why Lawyers Are at Increased Risk for Addiction,” Psychology Today (June 2017).

This may not be you, but it may be someone you know. A friend from law school, your partner, or a colleague. As the Psychology Today article points out, members of the legal profession are at increased risk and “need to be proactive in reaching out and leaning on their support system before they feel overwhelmed and trapped.” Getting educated on the topic is a start.

Mental health issues affect us all

Not only are lawyers more likely to struggle with alcohol abuse, we also suffer from disproportionately higher rates of mental health issues.

  • Many law students show signs of depression, anxiety, hostility and paranoia within 6 months of entering law school.
  • After the first year of law school, 40% of law students suffer from depression, which persists through law school and their careers.
  • Practicing lawyers find that they have to compromise their ethical principles or moral values, which creates a conflict in them.
  • They may also have to take and defend positions that are contrary to their belief system.
  • In the 2016 study referenced above, 6 of 10 participants reported anxiety, 1 of 2 reported depression, and nearly 1 in 8 reported ADHD. 1 in 9 reported suicidal thoughts at some point during their career.

Source: Indra Cidambi, M.D., “Drug and Alcohol Abuse in the Legal Profession: Why Lawyers Are at Increased Risk for Addiction,” Psychology Today (June 2017).

Getting help now

The Oregon Attorney Assistance Program provides assistance with and referral for problem alcohol, drug, and/or other substance use; stress management; time management; career transition; compulsive disorders (including problem gambling); relationships; depression; anxiety; and other issues that affect the ability of a lawyer or judge to function effectively. Services extend to Oregon law students and are free and confidential. If you or someone you know is affected by any of these issues, call (503-226-1057 or 800-321-OAAP) or contact the OAAP today.

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis