How to Say No to Clients

 

Did you answer “yes” to one or more of these questions?  You are in good company!

As we discussed in 7 Steps to Building Better Client Relationships, lawyers often feel pressured to practice “door law.”  The source of the pressure may be economic:  I don’t really have a choice because I need the money.  Or it can be emotional: Family, friends, or former clients are depending on me.

Either way, saying no can be incredibly difficult, so here is some sage advice that first appeared in In Sight.  These tips apply no matter who is doing the asking: clients, friends, family, or neighbors.

Five steps to saying “no”

  • Be respectful.  Listen to the asker and don’t interrupt. Respect the request, then respect your right to decline the request.
  • Keep it simple.  You have the right to say “no.”  Elaborate justifications aren’t necessary [and may lead to backsliding, since many of us say “yes” to avoid feeling guilty].
  • Assign responsibility elsewhere:  “That sounds very nice; unfortunately, my
    calendar is booked solid.” Now it’s your calendar’s fault. Stand firm. Avoid engaging in discussion or negotiation.
  • Refer to others who might fill the opening well.
  • Say yes when there is a good reason to do so, it will benefit you, or the cause is one you believe in.  [Life is too short to take on a case or client you find repugnant.]

I encourage you to read the full article here.

Still need persuading? Time for tough love

You are not the only lawyer who can help your clients.
If money is an issue, there are other lawyers who participate in the OSB modest means program, offer sliding fee services, or take pro bono referrals.  If you continually give your time away to nonpaying clients, your practice will decline and you may need to close your doors.  If you close your practice, you aren’t available to help anyone.

If the case can’t be won, are you doing a service or a disservice by taking it?
Once a lawyer commits to a case, many clients assume the case CAN BE WON, no matter how you qualify your representation.  Not all clients have a legal remedy, for a variety of reasons. This can be a bitter pill to swallow, but the truth is better than false hope.  You can always suggest [and should suggest] a second opinion.

A good case and a paying client don’t necessarily mean the case is right for you.
Don’t let someone push you out of your comfort zone. Law is complex. Staying on top of your desired practice areas is hard enough. Straying into unfamiliar areas is stressful, time consuming, expensive (because of the learning curve), and more likely to result in a claim or bar complaint.

You are a lawyer, not a doctor.
Keeping clients who won’t follow your advice, don’t cooperate, and look to place blame anywhere but with themselves, is a pure misery.  This is not a situation you can cure, except by firing the client.

All Rights Reserved 2018 – Beverly Michaelis

 

The Link Between Clutter and Stress

Why do we accumulate clutter?

  • Does it fuel our creativity?
  • Do possessions make us feel successful?  Or safe?
  • Make us look busy and important?
  • Are we too emotionally attached to weed out what we no longer need or use?
  • Are we hoping that someday our stuff will be worth a lot of money?
  • Or because we paid a lot of money for our stuff, it’s too good to get rid of?

In an extensive four-year study, UCLA researchers documented the debilitating effects of clutter on our mood and self-esteem. The greater the clutter, the more stress and anxiety we feel. This is especially true for women.

Tackling stress

There are many excellent articles on how to declutter. Start with these steps from Simplemost and HouseLogic. For ideas on managing stress, see the March 2017 issue of InSight. Read the article Stress Management: How to Reduce, Prevent, and Cope with Stress and download the associated Stress Management Self-Help Checklist and Stress Relief Toolbox. Don’t hesitate to contact an attorney counselor at the Oregon Attorney Assistance Program (OAAP). The OAAP can give you guidance on how to develop your own stress management program using deep relaxation, meditation, time management, and other proven stress-reducing techniques. Best of all, contacting the OAAP is free and confidential.

All Rights Reserved Beverly Michaelis 2018

Path to Lawyer Well-Being

A recording of the October 2017 ABA CLE webinar, “The Path to Lawyer Well-Being: Practical Recommendations for Positive Change,” is now available to view, free of charge. The webinar featured the report of the same name issued by the National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being which presents a series of recommendations directed at a variety of […]

via Free Recording of “The Path to Lawyer Well-Being” Webinar Now Available — CoLAP Cafe

Tackling Lawyer Debt

Money is a significant stressor in many people’s lives. Student loan and credit card debt can feel overwhelming, even paralyzing. Here are some resources that can help.

Student loan debt

In a recent guest post on Legal Ease, Andrew Josuweit of Student Loan Hero shared three solutions to ease the burden of student loan debt:

Start the process of tackling student loan debt by checking out the resources published by the Oregon New Lawyer Division. All three Oregon law schools offer a Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP) for their recent graduates. If you attended law school out-of-state, check with your law school to see if they offer their own LRAP. You may also be eligible for the Oregon State Bar’s LRAP program.

For an overview of this topic, check out Navigating Student Loan Repayment Options, a free CLE available on the Professional Liability Fund website.

Credit card debt

If you are struggling to chip away at your credit card debt, consider whether a balance transfer is right for you. In theory, a balance transfer credit card allows you swap out your high-rate card for a cheaper card, paying off your original balance. Nerdwallet recently published a list of the best balance transfer cards for 2018. Terms vary widely, so do your homework. But all in all, the Nerdwallet list seems to include some good deals:

  • Discover – No annual fee, 0% interest on purchases for 6 months and 0% on balance transfers for 18 months, rewards rate 1.00%
  • Citi Diamond – No annual fee, 0% on purchases for 12 months and 0% on balance transfers for 21 months
  • Chase Freedom – No annual fee, 0% on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, rewards rate 1.00%

For the pros and cons of pursuing a zero percent balance transfer, see this post.

Know your spending habits

Establish a system to track personal income and expenses. Free budget templates are available from Office 365, Mint, or these sourcesQuicken Deluxe is another good solution: cheap, easy to use, and a great value.

Speaking of budgets, have one. Each month, compare your actual income and expenses to the amounts you projected. If you see yourself going astray, make a mid-year course correction.

Be ready to make tough decisions and a few sacrifices to cut back on spending.

Managing the stress

Money management isn’t easy, and being in debt is stressful. But you are not alone. If you don’t know where to start, reach out to the attorney counselors at the Oregon Attorney Assistance Program (OAAP). They are supportive and can point you in the right direction. Help is free and confidential: 503-226-1057 or toll-free in Oregon 800-321-6227.

For an uplifting account of how one lawyer survived law school debt, read this article from the September 2017 issue of InSight, the OAAP publication.

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

Holiday Stress

You may feel there’s nothing you can do about stress.
The bills won’t stop coming, there will never be more
hours in the day, and your work and family responsibilities
will always be demanding. However, you have more
control over stress than you might think. No matter how
stressful your life seems, you can take steps to relieve
the pressure and regain balance.

Sage words from the March 2017 issue of InSight. Since the holidays can be an especially stressful time, consider taking a time out to evaluate how the four stress management strategies discussed in this article might work for you.

  • Download the “Stress Relief Toolbox” provided by the authors.  As they suggest, it’s not a bad idea to use one of these tools every day.  Don’t wait for stress to build up.
  • If you’re a list-maker, using the “Stress Management Self-Help Checklist” may appeal to you.  It’s a good way to stay on track and remind yourself of the importance of managing stress as part of your overall health.
  • Last, but not least: if you’re trying to get a handle on the stressors in your life, consider keeping a “Stress Journal.”

For specific advice on how to cope with holiday expectations and holiday-related stress, review these articles from the Oregon Attorney Assistance Program:

All Rights Reserved 2017 Beverly Michaelis