Collaboration Tools in Microsoft Word

Did you know that Microsoft Word has built-in collaboration tools? 

Word supports real-time chat and co-editing of documents online. Ready to start?  All you need is Microsoft OneDrive and Word 2016

Follow these steps:

  1. Save your document to OneDrive.
  2. Open your document in Word.
  3. Select Share on the ribbon (top right).
  4. Choose a contact to collaborate with by entering a name, email address, or searching your address book.
  5. Can edit permissions will be selected automatically in the drop-down. If desired, change to Can view instead.
  6. Add a message (optional).
  7. Click Share.

The “share” navigation pane in Word will display who owns the document, who can edit the document, and who can view the document.

On the receiving end, the person invited to edit your document will receive an email with the subject line, “I shared [name of document] with you in OneDrive.”  (A piece of advice: we live in an age of malware, so let your collaborator know the document is coming.)

Co-editing in Word

After you share your document, you can collaborate on that file at the same time with others.  Microsoft recommends working together in Word Online to see real-time changes. Colored flags will show you exactly where in the document each person is working.

Color flag in Word Online as you co-edit

Chat in Word

When editing together online, select Chat to open a chat window.  Type your message and press Enter to send.

Chat history is not saved when you close a document.  If the chat conversations are important, use copy and paste to preserve them: click in the Chat box, hit <Ctrl A> to select all, followed by <Ctrl C> to copy.  Open a new Word Document, paste the chat history using <Ctrl V>, save, and close.

Using Chat vs. Comments

Microsoft suggests using Chat when you want to communicate with others immediately, for example, to ask a quick question or divide sections among the co-editors.

Use Comments (on the Review tab on the ribbon) when you want to attach a comment to a specific selection within the document, such as when you need to ask if a word or phrase should be changed. Comments are saved with the document and can be replied to, marked as done or deleted.

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

Windows 10 – Cool New Features

This is the last of three posts on Windows 10.  Previously I examined specifications, compatibility issues, and default settings for Microsoft’s new OS.  Today I review all the cool new features Windows 10 has to offer.

Print to PDF

At long last, Windows has native, built-in, Print to PDF.  Any Windows application that supports printing to paper will now support printing to PDF.

A New Browser

Tired of Internet Explorer?  Meet Edge:

Biometric Security

Windows 10 uses face, iris, and fingerprint recognition – not user names and passwords – to unlock your computer.  Check out this video posted on Techlicious.

Meet Your Virtual Assistant(s)

Cortana is Siri’s new competition.  Touted as Microsoft’s virtual assistant, Cortana responds to voice commands to set reminders, track your schedule, or find documents.  To get the most out of Cortana, check out PC World’s comprehensive how-to guide.  To search popular cloud services and all devices connected to your PC, get the add-on REACHit.  Learn more here.

The Clutter Folder

If you have a love/hate relationship with your spam filter (blocks too much/doesn’t block enough), you may feel the same way about the Clutter folder in Windows Mail.  Email you probably don’t care about (ads? listserv messages? broadcast email?) can find its way to the Clutter folder.  Check this folder often, and if you find that legitimate, important messages are being diverted to “Clutter,” move them back to your inbox.  Windows Mail uses predictive filing to guess which emails are less important, and thus subject to filing in “Clutter.”  Over time, the Clutter tool will learn your preferences.  Find the Clutter folder under the “More” button in Mail.

Better Support for Multiple Monitors

Windows 10 now lets you scale each display separately, for example: set one display ratio for your tablet, use another setting for your desktop monitor(s).

Sync OneDrive Files

Gain full access to your OneDrive files by enabling the “fetch” feature.  PC World tells you how.

Laptop Battery Saver

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could optimize the battery life of your laptop?  Windows 10 makes it easy as pie.  Click on the Start menu, select: Settings > System > Battery Saver.

A Better File Explorer

If you use File Explorer to find files, you’ll appreciate the improvements made in Windows 10. The new “quick access” view now displays the most used/most recent files and folders.

Load Windows Apps from Anywhere

Before Windows 10, users could only load Windows Apps from the Windows store.  Now you can “sideload” an app from any source – just be aware that using an unofficial source may pose a security risk.  PC World describes how to enable sideloading.

Save Videos from any App or Program

This trick requires using Windows 10’s “Gaming DVR Tool.”  If you want to save actual video – not just a screenshot – read more about this feature here.

Many thanks to PC World and Techlicious for their excellent posts!

Final Thoughts

Let the buyer beware.  Remember our old Latin friend?  It applies here.  These features ARE cool, but many permit Microsoft or third parties to collect or access data about you.  If you didn’t read last week’s post on default settings, please do!

 All Rights Reserved [2015] Beverly Michaelis