Billing Practices and Lawyer Compensation

The new OSB 2017 Economic Survey is available for download. In it, you’ll find a plethora of information about Oregon lawyers, including employment characteristics, compensation, billing practices, career satisfaction, and future plans.  Here are a few highlights:

Employment Characteristics

  • 28.3% of survey respondents reported being a member of at least one other state bar.
  • 86.1% reported working as an Oregon lawyer; 13.9% were not.
  • Lawyers who chose to work part-time did so to maintain work/family balance, pursue other career interests, or because they were semi-retired.
  • Slightly more than 60% of working Oregon lawyers reported being in private practice, with just under 20% in government positions.
  • The most dominant areas of private practice are business/corporate (transactional and litigation), civil litigation (plaintiff and defense), tax/estate planning, family law, and real estate/land use/environmental.
  • The most common practice size was a 1 lawyer office, followed by 3-6 lawyer offices, and 7-20 lawyer offices.

Compensation

  • The statewide mean compensation was $143,277.
  • The amount of compensation was highest in the Portland metro area and lowest on the Oregon coast.
  • The highest paying area of practice was real estate/land use/environmental.
  • Statewide, female lawyers reported earning less than male lawyers.
  • Peak earning years were 50-59, with compensation generally decreasing after age 60.

Billing Practices

  • Statewide, the mean hourly rate was $286, ranging from $226 to $324 regionally. (The highest reported hourly rate was $850 in Portland.)
  • By area of practice, the highest hourly rate was for business/corporate – litigation, with a mean of $333.  Other top billing areas were: real estate/land use/environmental, civil litigation – defendant (excluding insurance defense), and business/corporate – transactional.

Career Satisfaction

  • On a scale of 1-5, with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied, lawyers statewide had a mean career satisfaction rate of 3.98. In general, the more years in practice, the greater a lawyer’s satisfaction with his/her career.
  • By location, employment, and area of practice, the most satisfied lawyers were:
    • In the Upper Willamette Valley
    • Working as judges or hearing officers
    • Practicing in civil litigation defense, real estate/land use/environmental, or criminal law (private bar).

Future Plans

  • 19.2% of lawyers statewide reported they were planning or contemplating retirement.
  • 6.7% were planning to leave the profession, but not retire.
  • Another 10.3% were planning to reduce their practices.

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

 

Reduce Work Hours and Meet Your Goals

Is it really possible to reduce your work hours and still accomplish what you need to get done?

Absolutely!  If you’re willing to reform your habits and work routine.

A new year offers the opportunity to step back and take a fresh look at how to run your practice.  As someone who likes the idea of starting over and trying something new I am here to encourage you.  Please read on.

business-office

Are you in a rut?

It’s human nature to follow a routine. And this isn’t necessarily a bad thing.  For example, following set procedures for responding to client email, docketing deadlines, or checking conflicts are helpful time management and malpractice avoidance techniques. The problem arises when we form work habits that are self-defeating or even life-threatening.

Working long hours can kill you

Several years ago I reported on a study from the Annals of Internal Medicine that found people “who work an average of 11 or more hours per day have a 67 percent higher risk of suffering a heart attack or dying from heart disease than people who work a standard seven- to eight-hour day.  Those who work between 10 and 11 hours per day have a 45 percent higher risk.”

For those of you who champion working hard and putting in long hours, these numbers are a sobering wakeup call.

Sitting is the new smoking

In 2016 came the admonition: get off your duff to improve your health.

While deadlines may sometimes dictate longer hours, sitting in your chair for 10 or 11 hours a day shouldn’t be the norm.  Long hours translate to physical stress, little or no time to exercise, and eating habits that are often less than stellar (like grabbing fast food on the way home.)

The truth is that none of us can maintain a “7-7-7 schedule” (7:00 am to 7:00 pm seven days a week) without suffering the consequences.  Even if you buy a treadmill or standing desk.

Resolve in 2018 to make changes

If I am describing you, stop.  You can do better, and you’ll be happier for it.  Here’s how to cut back the amount of time spent in the office and still accomplish what you need to get done.

Learn to say “goodbye” and “no.”

Two of my favorite words.  And they should be yours too.

Find it hard to turn people away?  I understand how you feel.  Lawyers face economic pressure: I don’t really have a choice.  I need the money.  And emotional pressure: Family, friends, or former clients are depending on me.  

Next time you want to say “no,” but are struggling, follow this simple advice.

Overwhelmed by the amount of work on your plate?

This is a good news/bad news scenario.

Let’s start with the “bad news” first.  You have too much to do and can’t get it done.  You may be paralyzed or depressed.  You don’t know where to start.  Call the attorney counselors at the Oregon Attorney Assistance Program (OAAP).  They provide free and confidential help with issues just like this.  They can also connect you to resources that can help relieve the pressure.

On the “good news” side, having too much to do means you can afford to be more picky about clients and cases.  Time to cull the herd:

What are your priorities?

What do you want to make a priority?  Create time that is sacrosanct to tackle what you want to get done by blocking out time on your calendar.  Treat this time as if it were a client appointment – take no calls, do not read email.  Stay off the Internet unless the task at hand involves being on the Internet.  Give the matter your undivided attention.

Multi-tasking is for the birds

Or rather, bird brains.  Literally.  It’s just about the worst thing you can try to do.

The idea that we can juggle ten things at once is a myth – we simply can’t do it.  Here is one of the better explanations I’ve read about why multi-tasking doesn’t work.  It was the inspiration for this post.  If you want to do something well, not start over ten times, remember it afterward, and get finished sooner, then single task!

You can control client expectations

Learn to shape and manage client expectations – from the very simple (availability by phone, ability to accommodate unscheduled appointments) to the more complex (meeting client deadlines).  The Professional Liability Fund (PLF) offers sample client brochures that explain office and billing practices.  Consider ordering the OSB-accredited webinar, Seven Steps to Building Better Client Relations.

Give yourself a break with this easy time management technique

Form a new habit for 2018.  Check your calendar first before making a time-related promise to a client.  If there is no “deadline” per se, determine when you can reasonably fit the project into your schedule.  You gain nothing by promising a quick turnaround if you can’t keep your word.

In a pickle? Triage!

If you’re in a pickle – a deadline is approaching and you know you can’t meet it – start triaging.  Call your client.  Call opposing counsel if necessary.  Negotiate a new due date.

I know facing up to deadlines is hard.  I also know many lawyers hesitate to call their clients or the other side because they fear being yelled at.  Know this: your clients and the other side are far more understanding than you give them credit for.  Everyone has been there.  They get it.  It turns out that waiting is not really that big of a problem ninety-nine percent of the time.  And if you need support making these kind of calls, just give a ring to the nice folks at the OAAP.

Get back in control

Getting help may be just the ticket to get your workflow back in control.  Consider temporary staff or a contract attorney.  Questions?  Call your friendly practice management advisor at the PLF for help.

Leaving early?  Good for you!

Last but not least, ditch the guilt of leaving early – it is your well-deserved reward for good planning and efficient work habits.

All Rights Reserved Beverly Michaelis 2018

Postscript

Have I given this advice before?  Absolutely.  But a reminder never hurts.  Especially if you know, as I do, that we all feel discouraged from time to time.  Never forget: you can start over and you can make a change.  Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Best Password Generators for the New Year

A reader recently recommended I revisit the subject of random password generators, many of which also log passwords for us.  Everyone seems to know about LastPass, but are there any other options?

Luckily, TechRadar and PC Magazine have done the work for us.  LastPass topped both lists for “best password generator of 2017,” followed by DashLane.  Also worth your consideration:

Which is the best?

It depends on what you want the password generator to do.  For example, RoboForm also serves as a digital wallet and form filler – helping you securely complete online forms.  If your top priority is free, look at KeePass, but remember the features are limited.  For a side-by-side comparison of cost and what each option offers, see the PC Magazine post.  Once you’ve narrowed your choices down, check out TechRadar, which has more in-depth reviews.

All Rights Reserved – Beverly Michaelis 2018

Happy New Year!

Year in Review

As 2017 comes to a close, here is the “in case you missed it” review, featuring the most important posts of the year:

Client Relations

eCourt

Ethics

File Management

Financial Management

Marketing & Social Media

New Lawyers

Office Systems

Partnership

Solo & Small Firm Practices

Staffing

Stress Management

Technology & Security

Year-end CLE – Save 20%

A friendly reminder: the On Demand CLE sale ends in four days on
December 31!  Don’t miss out!

Save 20% off on all orders over $40.  Use the code WINTER2017 at Oregon Law Practice Management On Demand CLE.