Westlaw’s New Search Tool – The Carat ^

From our friend The Researching Paralegal, a great legal research tip!

Westlaw has added an important search term, the carat (^) (shift 6 on your keyboard). This allows you to put more emphasis on a search term. To use it, place the carat symbol right behind the term you want emphasized.

Here is a further explanation from Cleveland Marshall College of Law Library Blog:

You can use the caret in the main search box or in Search Within Results. An example of a search is:

liability /p (park^ or recreation or camp!)

This would place the emphasis on the term “park” and your results will be somewhat different if you run the search with or without the caret.

You can read more about Search Term Emphasis in the Search Tips document that you’ll find linked to the right of the main search box in Westlaw.

Find the caret symbol above the 6 key on a standard qwerty keyboard. Not to be confused with the carrot.

As The Researching Paralegal reminds us – If you need a refresher on Westlaw Edge, check this out:

Westlaw’s Guide to Law Review Research.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

How COVID-19 Will Change Solo and Mid-Size Law Firms

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A recent report by Clio assessing the impacts of the coronavirus on the legal industry and consumers found that the virus has created a 40 percent drop in the number of new legal matters opened per week. Almost half of the polled consumers said that if they had a legal issue, they would delay seeking legal help until after the virus subsided. Further, 22 percent of consumers indicated they were under the impression that attorneys stopped working altogether because of COVID-19.

From our friends at NW Sidebar.

This post focuses on how COVID-19 is likely to affect small to mid-size law firms. I encourage you to read the full post. Here are some key points of interest:

Life is different and also the same. Clients expect you to cater to their needs. Put yourself in their shoes and you will do well.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

 

What We Know Now About COVID-19

The science around COVID-19 is changing so fast that even the valid-but-evolving research findings seem to blend in with the misinformation coming in from all sides.

Learn what scientists are saying now about how the coronavirus is spread, whether to wear a mask, who is at risk, and social distancing – all courtesy of Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Curious about how a vaccine would work? Check out this video

OSB COVID-19 Response

For the latest information from the Oregon State Bar, visit the COVID-19 Response page.

On that note, the OSB needs bar exam proctors to staff four separate exam sites in Portland, Salem, and Eugene. Applicants will be separated into multiple rooms at each location.

If you are available July 28 and/or July 29 and would like to serve as a proctor, complete the OSB Bar Exam Proctor application form, which includes descriptions of proctor responsibilities and requirements.

Training Staff in Small Bites

Getting someone’s attention is tough. Keeping it is even tougher. So why not adapt?

When setting up a training program for staff, offer content that is easily digestible:

  • Choose a theme
  • Set a training period
  • Collect content
  • Divide the content into segments
  • Keep each segment short and limited to one topic

For example, you could designate July as “security” month and distribute brief training segments every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Choosing a strong password, avoiding phishing scams, and working remotely could be your first three topics.

Why This Approach?

I’ve been training lawyers and staff for decades. We belong to a profession that values continuing education, but we’re also busy and under pressure. When you distill information it is easier to absorb. Keeping it short means the listener or reader can get what they need and move on with their day.

Where Can I Find Content?

Look to your favorite law blogs. Besides yours truly, Attorney at Work, Lawyerist, and others listed by the ABA Journal are a good start.

Law Practice Today is another great resource. They do themed issues, which makes finding relevant content easier. Access the archives here.

Also see Law Technology Today. Specifically their videos and “quick tips.”

Depending on the topics you wish to address, bar and other professional publications can be helpful too.

Get Staff Involved

While you undoubtedly have some topics in mind, be sure to illicit ideas from staff. What would they like to see covered? Know more about? Ask for their tips or delegate content research to spread the load. Training doesn’t have to be a one-person act.

All rights reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis.

Apps to Help Law Firms Reopen

In our discussion about COVID-19, we’ve reviewed phase one guidelines and specific steps to take in reopening your firm. One of these is whether to screen employees before returning to work. Sounds reasonable, but how exactly should you go about it? Today we take a look.

Thermal Imaging Cameras, Digital Thermometers, and Self Evaluations

Feever

Feever is an artificial intelligence (AI) based, non-contact thermal imaging technology that detects individuals in a crowd with an elevated temperature. Utilizing a thermal imaging camera and the AI based mobile app, Feevr automatically alerts users when a scanned person’s temperature exceeds a predetermined threshold, allowing for immediate intervention. At a price point of $3250 it isn’t cheap and probably better suited to venues that need to easily screen large groups of patrons. Nevertheless, if this solution sounds appealing, do your research. At least one group has severely criticized Feev’rs accuracy.

Feevr PreCheck

Feevr PreCheck is a more economical “sister” product of Feevr, priced at $299.99. The app lets employees take a temperature reading at home – a far more appealing approach for everyone.

With PreCheck employers would give each worker a digital thermometer connected to a smartphone. Readings would be relayed automatically to the firm through the app. Anyone with an elevated temperature would be instructed to stay home.

Everbridge

Everbridge uses a different approach, based in crisis management communication. Their app allows employers to blast messages out to all employees, one of which includes a COVID-19 self-evaluation. Workers are asked if they have symptoms or if they’ve already had the disease and recovered. They can tap the answers into a smartphone, and the employer can use the results to decide who comes into work and who stays at home. Everbridge calls this “IT alerting,” with licenses costing between $32 and $50 per month.

ProtectWell

ProtectWell is a free app developed by Microsoft and UnitedHealth. Like Everbridge, it uses a COVID-19 self evaluation. Here’s how it works:

Employees are invited to download the ProtectWell app.

Before starting work, employees use the symptom screener to answer a few quick questions.

Employees are instantly notified if they are ready to work, need to stay home and manage symptoms or get tested (where available).

To learn more, consider watching the ProtectWell demo (two minutes you won’t regret). Have questions? ProtectWell promises a next business day turnaround on their contact submission page. They also offer free return to work guidelines that are worth checking out. On the contact page, under “How can we help?” select “I would like a free copy of Return to Work Guidelines.”

Six More Apps to Screen Employee Health

Visit the Human Resource Director blog to read about six more apps to screen employee health.

Legalities

You’re the lawyers. If you’re not sure what you can or cannot do, get advice. Oregon’s employment law bloggers have been busy, as a Google search reveals. You can also chat directly with a colleague. (Ask friends for referrals if you don’t already know someone with the right expertise.)  Government websites are also your friend:

What Should I Do Next?

Using a symptom-checker or self evaluation app is a no-brainer. I can’t imagine why firms wouldn’t use ProtectWell at a minimum. Asking employees to self evaluate for a series of symptoms is more accurate than relying exclusively on the presence of fever.

Whatever you do, stay safe.

All Rights Reserved Beverly Michaelis 2020