Quick Tip: Fix Launch Problems with Outlook 2016

If Outlook 2016 hangs at the processing/start screen, odds are you have a conflict with an add-in.  For example, Kaspersky’s anti-spam add-in, which recently caused problems for me.

The link above explains how to fix this problem, but let me distill it for you:

If you are trying to run Outlook now, stop it:

  1. Use the tried and true CTRL ALT DEL combination.
  2. Select Task Manager.
  3. Click “Yes” if prompted: “Do you want this App to make changes to your PC?”
  4. At the top of the Task Manager under Apps, select Microsoft Outlook.
  5. In the bottom right hand corner of Task Manager, click on “End Task.”

Start Outlook in “safe mode.”

  1. Right-click on the Start button.
  2. Select Run.
  3. In the open box, type Outlook /safe (There is a space after Outlook)
  4. Click OK.
  5. The choose Profile box opens, click OK.
  6. Select the File tab, and choose “Slow and Disabled Add-ins.”
  7. Disable the problem add-in (in my case, Kaspersky’s anti-spam feature).
  8. Click OK.  Close Outlook.

Restart Outlook as usual.

[All Rights Reserved Beverly Michaelis 2016]

Digital Distraction: A Thief of Client Relationships?

Technology has its good points.  Mobile devices and apps give us 24/7 access to information and knowledge.  “As long as we have the Internet, we can be productive,” or so we tell ourselves.  But is it possible that tech is hurting our client relationships and we don’t even know it?

Your smartphone, smartwatch, and tablet are great gadgets – don’t get me wrong.  The 2015 ABA Tech Survey reported that an astonishing 60% of lawyers use iPhones; 40% use iPads.  Used consciously, as a tools, these devices serve us well.  The danger arises when we fail to appreciate that their mere presence may be disturbing to our clients.

Don’t Put Your Phone on the Table During a Client Meeting

In 2012, researchers at Essex University conducted two studies to learn how the presence and use of a mobile phone affected social interactions among strangers.  The participants were paired off and sat in private booths.  In half the cases, a mobile phone was placed nearby.  For the other half, a notebook was left in the same place instead of a mobile phone.  The studies revealed:

  • If a mobile phone is visible during a conversation it causes people to feel less positive towards the person with whom they are chatting.
  • The presence of a mobile phone reduces the level of empathy and understanding in face-to-face conversations.
  • Mobile phones can have negative effects on closeness, connection, and conversation quality.

‘These results demonstrate that the presence of mobile phones can interfere with human relationships, an effect that is most clear when individuals are discussing personally meaningful topics,’ the researchers wrote.  Credit to the Daily Mail.

All Client Meetings are ‘Personally Meaningful’ – Follow These Easy Fixes to Avoid Digital Distraction

The lesson here is obvious and easy: put your devices away!

Keep your phone in your pocket, purse, or briefcase during client meetings.  If you are expecting an important call (from a Judge or hard-to-reach expert) tell the client before the meeting that you may need to take a call.  But don’t use this as an excuse to keep your phone on your desk.

Not expecting a call?  How about setting your iPhone to Airplane Mode, which will automatically silence your Apple watch?

Worried about taking notes without your trusty laptop or tablet?   Don’t.  Turns out note taking is substantially more effective when done by hand, and your legal pad doesn’t need WiFi or an outlet.

Follow the Five Keys to a Successful Client Meeting

  • Avoid distractions (I think we covered this, but there is more to learn)
  • Prepare for your meeting
  • Create an agenda to stay on track
  • Anticipate and prepare for questions
  • Prepare a post-meeting summary and action list for the client

These excellent suggestions come from Tonya Pierce and appear on AgileLaw.  I highly recommend reading the original post.

[All Rights Reserved 2016 Beverly Michaelis]

 

 

 

 

 

Get Organized by Visualizing Your Workflow

How can you be more productive?  One simple solution is to visualize your workflow by tracking to-dos and tasks in a way that keeps them front and center.

Kanban – inspired by lean and “just-in-time” manufacturing processes – is one way to get it done.  How can this work for lawyers?  Read this post to find out: How Lawyers Can Use Kanban to Visualize Workflow — NWSidebar.

Inspired to learn more?  Check out:

[All Rights Reserved 2016 Beverly Michaelis]

7 Steps You Can Take Now to Protect Your Data

lockUnless you’ve been playing ostrich, you’re likely aware that data breaches and ransomware are about as common as Mom and apple pie.  Witness the recent hack of 272 million Gmail, Microsoft, and Yahoo! accounts.

Fortunately, there are simple steps you can take now that will help protect your data.  [With thanks and all due credit to Lane Powell’s Beyond IP Law post, The Scariest Hack So Far, for inspiring this elucidation of their original list]:

Step 1: Start Using Encryption

For your desktop, cloud-based accounts, mobile devices – anywhere or any place you store or transmit confidential or private information.  For a thorough discussion of how to implement encryption throughout your firm, see Encryption Made Simple for Lawyers, now a book available for purchase on the ABA website.  (Non-ABA members in Oregon can save money at checkout by using the OSB Professional Liability Fund discount code: OSBPLF.)

Step 2: Set Up Two-Factor Authentication for Cloud Services

“The concept of two-factor authentication is that a person cannot access another user’s account without something she knows and something she has. In the case of popular services (like Google or Dropbox), the solution is a strong password plus a secondary code that is sent via text to a smartphone or mobile device.”  Catherine Sanders Reach, Set Up Two-Factor Authentication: What Are You Waiting For?  [Read Catherine’s post for step-by-step directions or search Help in your cloud-based service for assistance in setting up two-factor authentication.]

Step 3:  Erect Firewalls

Firewalls sit between you and the rest of the Internet.  They protect unauthorized access to your computer by ignoring or repelling information that appears to come from unsecured, unknown, or suspicious locations.  The best firewall configuration is a one-two punch:  hardware firewall + software firewall.

Setting up a hardware firewall requires no effort on your part.  While you can buy a stand-alone appliance, hardware firewalls are now automatically incorporated into your router (the box in your office or house installed by your Internet Service Provider).

Software firewalls are installed on your computer system like any other application, and are also easy/breezy since they are typically built into anti-virus software.  (See discussion that follows.)

Step 4: Install Anti-Virus, Anti-Malware, Anti-Spyware Programs and Keep Them Updated

This seems pretty explanatory, but let me add some free advice:

  • Don’t disable automatic updates to your virus definition database
  • Run quick scans when prompted
  • Run full scans at least monthly
  • Don’t ignore notifications that your software isn’t running properly

For a list of the best anti-virus utilities for PCs, see this list from PC Magazine.  For a list of the best anti-virus utilities for Macs, check out this MacWorld post.  For other recommendations, run a Google search.

My personal opinion: run far, far away from McAfee.  [I really don’t give a rip that it is “now part of Intel Security.”]  First, McAfee blocked access to my work VPN (virtual private network).  There was no way to set a rule or create an exception and tech support was incredibly unhelpful.  Second, McAfee is notoriously hard to uninstall. Using Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel is only the first step; you must download a separate application from McAfee to get rid of it.  I mention this because McAfee tends to come pre-installed on laptops or desktops purchased from retailers like Best Buy.  What to do?  If McAfee was inflicted on you (pre-installed), get rid of it.  Follow the link above for the uninstaller.  Next, buy Kaspersky.  I have been very pleased with Kaspersky from day one and it has never interfered with my VPN connection.

Step 5:  Run Operating System and Other Software Updates

This also seems self-explanatory.  Mac and Windows OS ship with automatic updates enabled – don’t fuss with this.  If Microsoft or Apple thinks you need a security patch, a fix, or upgrade, let it run.  The same goes for every application installed on your computer:  Microsoft Office, Acrobat DC, Quicken, QuickBooks – let automatic updates run.  If you’re not sure whether automatic updates are enabled, check Help or search the product’s website.  Some programs also allow you to manually search for updates. Acrobat DC is an example.  In the menu, select Help, and choose “Check for Updates…”

Step 6:  Be Ready to Kill Your System If You Suspect a Breach

In the original post which inspired me to write on this topic, author Jane E. Brown comments: “Consider using a “kill switch”— when suspicious events happen, the IT department should automatically be notified and the network should shut down if no protective measures are taken.”

I have known of events that required a kill switch.  One Oregon lawyer was hacked via a phishing email.  The hacker was able to get enough information from the lawyer and the lawyer’s system to contact clients by email and request that they input credit card information to pay their bills. Fortunately, a few clients recognized that this request was outside the lawyer’s usual billing process and called the office.  The lawyer had to pull the kill switch and take other steps, including freezing bank accounts.  This turned out to be a smart move, as within 24 hours the hacker also attempted to withdraw thousands of dollars from the lawyer’s trust account.

Step 7:  Lose Your Device?  Lose Your Credentials.

There are some obvious times when it makes sense to reset or revoke user names and passwords (login credentials):

  • At termination
  • If a network-connected device is lost
  • You experience a security intrusion
  • Your security, privacy, or confidential policies are breached

Final Thoughtsth

None of these steps are difficult, but bouncing back from a security breach is.

 

 

[All Rights Reserved 2016 Beverly Michaelis]

Using – and Clearing – Jump Lists in Windows 10

A great Windows 10 tip from Jan Berinstein at CompuSavvy:

“Jump lists,” first introduced in Windows 7, are the right-click menus of options for the applications that appear in the Windows Taskbar (the horizontal bar that typically runs across the bottom of the screen).  Most people probably are unaware that they even exist.  In fact, they’re quite handy.  They provide quick access to commonly used programs – […]
https://compusavvy.wordpress.com/2016/04/04/using-and-clearing-jump-lists-in-windows-10/