How COVID-19 Will Change Solo and Mid-Size Law Firms

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A recent report by Clio assessing the impacts of the coronavirus on the legal industry and consumers found that the virus has created a 40 percent drop in the number of new legal matters opened per week. Almost half of the polled consumers said that if they had a legal issue, they would delay seeking legal help until after the virus subsided. Further, 22 percent of consumers indicated they were under the impression that attorneys stopped working altogether because of COVID-19.

From our friends at NW Sidebar.

This post focuses on how COVID-19 is likely to affect small to mid-size law firms. I encourage you to read the full post. Here are some key points of interest:

Life is different and also the same. Clients expect you to cater to their needs. Put yourself in their shoes and you will do well.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

 

What We Know Now About COVID-19

The science around COVID-19 is changing so fast that even the valid-but-evolving research findings seem to blend in with the misinformation coming in from all sides.

Learn what scientists are saying now about how the coronavirus is spread, whether to wear a mask, who is at risk, and social distancing – all courtesy of Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Curious about how a vaccine would work? Check out this video

OSB COVID-19 Response

For the latest information from the Oregon State Bar, visit the COVID-19 Response page.

On that note, the OSB needs bar exam proctors to staff four separate exam sites in Portland, Salem, and Eugene. Applicants will be separated into multiple rooms at each location.

If you are available July 28 and/or July 29 and would like to serve as a proctor, complete the OSB Bar Exam Proctor application form, which includes descriptions of proctor responsibilities and requirements.

Training Staff in Small Bites

Getting someone’s attention is tough. Keeping it is even tougher. So why not adapt?

When setting up a training program for staff, offer content that is easily digestible:

  • Choose a theme
  • Set a training period
  • Collect content
  • Divide the content into segments
  • Keep each segment short and limited to one topic

For example, you could designate July as “security” month and distribute brief training segments every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Choosing a strong password, avoiding phishing scams, and working remotely could be your first three topics.

Why This Approach?

I’ve been training lawyers and staff for decades. We belong to a profession that values continuing education, but we’re also busy and under pressure. When you distill information it is easier to absorb. Keeping it short means the listener or reader can get what they need and move on with their day.

Where Can I Find Content?

Look to your favorite law blogs. Besides yours truly, Attorney at Work, Lawyerist, and others listed by the ABA Journal are a good start.

Law Practice Today is another great resource. They do themed issues, which makes finding relevant content easier. Access the archives here.

Also see Law Technology Today. Specifically their videos and “quick tips.”

Depending on the topics you wish to address, bar and other professional publications can be helpful too.

Get Staff Involved

While you undoubtedly have some topics in mind, be sure to illicit ideas from staff. What would they like to see covered? Know more about? Ask for their tips or delegate content research to spread the load. Training doesn’t have to be a one-person act.

All rights reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis.

Remembering Those Who Paid the Ultimate Sacrifice

Today is Memorial Day. A fitting time to share some facts and traditions about the meaning behind the day. The following comes from The Old Farmer’s Almanac.

A Very Brief History

Honoring ancestors by decorating and cleaning graves is an ancient practice. Recognizing the military dead specifically started in earnest after the Civil War, usually on the occasion of family gatherings and picnics in the summer. The holiday we know today began in 1971.

The Red Poppy

The origin of wearing a red poppy comes from a poem written over 100 years ago:

In November 1918, days before the official end of the war, an American professor named Moina Michael wrote her own poem, “We Shall Keep the Faith,” which was inspired by McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields.” In her poem (also shown below), she mentioned wearing the “poppy red” to honor the dead, and with that, the tradition of adorning one’s clothing with a single red poppy in remembrance of those killed in the Great War was born. Moina herself came to be known—and honored—as “The Poppy Lady.”

Learn More

Learn more about Decoration Day, aka Memorial Day here.