ABA TECHSHOW 2020

It’s officially a wrap. Did you miss ABA TECHSHOW 2020? Get all the apps, gadgets, tech, and tips fit to print right here on Wakelet! Topics include:

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While you’re at it, be sure to check out the TECHSHOW blog.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

Idaho Allows Fee Disgorgement for Breach of Fiduciary Duty

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In a case of first impression, the Idaho Supreme Court recently held that fee disgorgement is available as a remedy against a lawyer for breach of fiduciary duty even if there are no resulting damages.

Parkinson v. Bevis, 448 P.3d 1027 (Idaho 2019), involved comparatively simple facts: A lawyer representing plaintiff Rebecca Parkinson in her divorce proceedings shared a confidential attorney-client communication with opposing counsel. In a subsequent lawsuit against the lawyer, Parkinson conceded that she was not damaged by the unauthorized disclosure—instead framing her claim as one for breach of fiduciary duty seeking fee disgorgement as a remedy. The trial court dismissed the claim, but the Idaho Supreme Court reversed.

The Idaho Supreme Court first distinguished breach of fiduciary duty from legal malpractice: “A breach of fiduciary duty claim is an equitable claim for which a defendant may have to disgorge compensation received during the time the breach occurred, even if the plaintiff cannot show actual damages.” 448 P.3d at 1033.

via Idaho Supreme Court Allows Fee Disgorgement for Breach of Fiduciary Duty — NWSidebar

A result of interest to Oregon lawyers, since a fee disgorgement claim not involving negligence is unlikely to be covered by the Professional Liability Fund.

 

Tiplet: Bank Holds on IOLTA Deposits

Most lawyers are aware that funds held in trust cannot be disbursed until they are fully cleared. Deposits submitted electronically or by wire speed up the process, as does cash. Credit card payments are generally settled and in your account within one to three business days. Checks are usually the slowest to process and are not “cleared” until they are collected and paid by the issuing bank, even if the lawyer’s bank has a policy of making funds available in a shorter period of time. See Sylvia Stevens, Waiting for ‘Go’ Dough: A primer on disbursing client funds, OSB Bulletin 21 (June 2006).

The Professional Liability Fund recommends:

For an ordinary transaction with an established client or known third party, wait three banking days for locally written checks, five banking days for checks written within Oregon, but outside your local area, and ten or more banking days for out-of-state checks. Note, that checks for
$5,000 and over may be held by banks for seven banking days, whether drawn on a local, instate, or out-of-state bank, therefore allow sufficient time for these checks.

To avoid the growing problem of check scams, wait at least ten banking days before disbursing funds in the following circumstances: (1) the transaction is with a new client or a client you are unsure about; (2) the check is very large; (especially compared with the extent of legal services
provided, if the check is a retainer); (3) the check is from an unknown third party; or (4) any aspect of the transaction raises (or should raise) your suspicions. Remember that drafts or other instruments may take longer than ten days to process. To verify that funds have been collected, ask your bank to contact the issuing bank.

Source: “Frequently Asked Trust Account Questions.” From the PLF website, select Practice Management > Forms > Trust Accounting.

How to shorten bank holds

When are holds applied?

Holds may be applied by your local branch at the time of deposit or overnight during processing. Since checks over $5,000 are the most likely to present problems, review your accounts carefully. If in doubt, contact your bank.

 

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis