Properly Redact Your Documents

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Improper redaction has been in the news repeatedly over the past few years, thanks to the revelation of confidential information in a handful of high-profile cases by way of failure to redact completely. Redaction is not a complicated process if you’re using the correct software, but you do have to know how to use it correctly. “How To…Properly Redact Your Documents” takes a look at this process in Adobe Acrobat DC Pro. Watch it to make sure you don’t wind up the next headline!

via Properly Redact Your Documents — CBA Law Practice Management & Technology

Excellent advice from our comrades at the Chicago Bar Association! For newbies, let me add a few thoughts:

How redaction works in Acrobat Pro DC

Redaction permanently removes visible text and graphics from a document. To begin redaction, open a PDF in Acrobat Pro DC and choose Tools > Redact. In the redaction toolbar, select Mark for Redaction > Text & Images. You may also redact entire pages or search for content to redact. To remove the marked items, click Apply in the redaction toolbar, and then click OK.

Quick Pointers

  • Redaction is permanent, no joke. You can’t undo it once your document is saved. If this is your first attempt, make a copy of your document and experiment.
  • Best practices are to save a before and after copy of your PDF (unredacted and redacted). This should be easy enough as Acrobat will automatically save the redacted version of your file as [original file name]_redacted.pdf unless you overwrite the file name.
  • When content is removed, you get to choose what appears in its place – redaction codes, custom overlay text, a colored box, or nothing at all. These settings are controlled using the properties tool in the redaction toolbar. Before you start set redaction properties. If you aren’t sure what you want, make a copy of your document and test different property settings.

More Resources

For complete step-by-step directions on how to redact or remove hidden sensitive information, see this post from Adobe.

All Rights Reserved 2020 Beverly Michaelis

Effective Conflict Systems

Join me on Wednesday, March 11, 2020 for Effective Conflict Systems and learn the ethical principles behind conflict-of-interest screening, how to avoid common ethical traps, and the process of choosing, operating, and implementing effective conflict systems. Oregon-specific MCLE Ethics (.75) and Practical Skills (.50) credits pending.

Here are some of the issues this CLE will address:

  • When is the lawyer-client relationship formed?
  • What are my ethical duties toward prospects vs. current or former clients?
  • How essential are disengagement letters vis-a-vis conflicts?
  • Is a formal conflict tracking system ethically necessary?
  • When should I run a conflict check?
  • Who should be included in my conflict system?
  • What are best practices for conflict procedures?
  • How can I avoid ethical traps involving dual roles, multiple clients, firm transitions, office sharing, and more?
  • What resources are available to help with conflict evaluation and screening?

When & Where: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Pacific Time. This is a live, online webinar.

Group Discounts: Available to firms who wish to register 5 or more attendees. Contact me for more information.

Participate in Polling & Ask Questions: Questions are welcome during the live event. Attendees are also encouraged to participate in live, anonymous polling.

How to Register

Register herechoose the image above, or visit the Upcoming CLE page. Secure payment processing powered by Eventbrite. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express accepted. Program materials included in the $25 registration price.

Can’t Attend?

Video and audio recordings will be available to download along with the program materials shortly after the live program event.  Price: $25. Contact me or visit my online CLE store to place an order.

Register Now!

All Rights Reserved 2020 – Beverly Michaelis

 

Ethics of Disaster Recovery and Data Breaches

Coming December 10 at 1:00 pm Eastern, 10:00 am Pacific – a lawyer’s ethical duties in responding to disasters and data breaches. Featuring ABA Formal Opinion 483: Lawyers’ Obligations After an Electronic Data Breach or Cyberattack and Formal Opinion 482: Ethical Obligations Related to Disasters (2018).

This session will offer real-life examples on how to recover from a disaster or a data breach — ethically.

Disasters and data breaches bring with them conflicting priorities to resolve. Duties of disclosure compete with those of confidentiality for your attention. The responsibility to provide legal services for which your clients have contracted may be adversely affected by disaster. Model Rules 1.4 and 1.6 provide the standards and the recent ABA opinions flesh out your ethical duties in the event of a disaster (natural or man-made) or a data breach (which is of course a very specific form of a disaster!).

Join our panel of experts as they guide you through these opinions with practical examples of how best to ensure you and your clients are protected in the face of this new world and all it has to throw at you.

This is a free CLE for ABA members. Register here.

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis

Tiplet: Bank Holds on IOLTA Deposits

Most lawyers are aware that funds held in trust cannot be disbursed until they are fully cleared. Deposits submitted electronically or by wire speed up the process, as does cash. Credit card payments are generally settled and in your account within one to three business days. Checks are usually the slowest to process and are not “cleared” until they are collected and paid by the issuing bank, even if the lawyer’s bank has a policy of making funds available in a shorter period of time. See Sylvia Stevens, Waiting for ‘Go’ Dough: A primer on disbursing client funds, OSB Bulletin 21 (June 2006).

The Professional Liability Fund recommends:

For an ordinary transaction with an established client or known third party, wait three banking days for locally written checks, five banking days for checks written within Oregon, but outside your local area, and ten or more banking days for out-of-state checks. Note, that checks for
$5,000 and over may be held by banks for seven banking days, whether drawn on a local, instate, or out-of-state bank, therefore allow sufficient time for these checks.

To avoid the growing problem of check scams, wait at least ten banking days before disbursing funds in the following circumstances: (1) the transaction is with a new client or a client you are unsure about; (2) the check is very large; (especially compared with the extent of legal services
provided, if the check is a retainer); (3) the check is from an unknown third party; or (4) any aspect of the transaction raises (or should raise) your suspicions. Remember that drafts or other instruments may take longer than ten days to process. To verify that funds have been collected, ask your bank to contact the issuing bank.

Source: “Frequently Asked Trust Account Questions.” From the PLF website, select Practice Management > Forms > Trust Accounting.

How to shorten bank holds

When are holds applied?

Holds may be applied by your local branch at the time of deposit or overnight during processing. Since checks over $5,000 are the most likely to present problems, review your accounts carefully. If in doubt, contact your bank.

 

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis