Fresh Start for the New Year

The new year offers each of us the chance to make changes. Not by setting lofty goals, but by committing to small adjustments that can make a big difference in attitude, health, and resilience. Here are 7 micro goals that anyone can follow.

Micro Goal 1 – Cut Your Work Hours

Several years ago I reported on a study from the Annals of Internal Medicine that found people “who work an average of 11 or more hours per day have a 67 percent higher risk of suffering a heart attack or dying from heart disease than people who work a standard seven- to eight-hour day.  Those who work between 10 and 11 hours per day have a 45 percent higher risk.”

Your micro goal: Commit to a 9 hour (or less) work day. The occasional exception is fine, just don’t backslide.

Micro Goal 2 – Stand, Move, Stretch

Sitting in your chair for hours on end shouldn’t be the norm. Stand, move, stretch. Consider a treadmill or standing desk. Better yet, leave the office for a few minutes and walk around the block! Your joints and muscles will thank you.

Your micro goal: Move at least once an hour. Use a cheap timer, an app, recurring task reminders, or whatever it takes to remind yourself to get up. No one will care if you stretch during a deposition or walk to the back of the room during a CLE.

Micro Goal 3 – Just Say No

Find it hard to turn people away? You aren’t alone. I don’t really have a choice. I need the money. Family, friends, or former clients are depending on me. These are things we tell ourselves. Follow this advice to turn the tide.

Your micro goal: Say no at least once a month. As you gain confidence, don’t hesitate to say no whenever necessary.

Micro Goal 4 – Say Goodbye

Too much to do and not enough time? Cull the herd.

  • Review your current client list for matters you regret taking.  If feasible, say goodbye to those clients.
  • Farm out work or delegate to others in your firm. If you’re a solo/small firm practitioner, reach out to colleagues for referrals to a contract lawyer who can get you over the hump.

Your micro goal: Apply your newfound client/case criteria to future matters and screen out cases that aren’t a good match for you.

Micro Goal 5 – Protect your Priorities

What do you want to get done? What are your priorities? When is the last time you even thought about what you wanted?

It’s easy to get pushed around by interruptions: phone calls, texts, emails, pop-in clients, or colleagues.

Your micro goal: Block out time on your calendar for work you want to get done. Treat this time as if it were a client appointment. (No interruptions allowed.) Stay off the Internet unless the task at hand involves being on the Internet. Give the matter your undivided attention.

Micro Goal 6 – Put Your Calendar First

If your calendar contains your personal and business commitments, including time blocks to get work done, let it determine the scheduling for all new promises.

Your micro goal: Check your calendar before promising completion of a time-related task. If there is no “deadline” per se, determine when you can reasonably fit the new project into your schedule. Add it to your calendar and back it up with a task reminder. You gain nothing by promising a quick turnaround if you can’t keep your word.

Micro Goal 7 – Triage When You Know You Can’t Meet a Deadline

If you’re in a pickle – a deadline is approaching and you know you can’t meet it  – the best approach is to face it head on. I know this can be hard. We assume clients or other lawyers will yell at us. The truth is, people are more understanding than we give them credit for. Everyone has been there. They get it.

Your micro goal: Renegotiate deadlines you can’t meet.

You can start over. You can make changes. Never let anyone tell you otherwise.

All Rights Reserved Beverly Michaelis 2020

 

Resolve to Improve Your Practice in the New Year

What are your New Year’s resolutions?

 

You don’t really have to choose, because in 2020 you’ll see posts on all these topics and more!

STREAMLINE YOUR PRACTICE IN THE NEW YEAR

We begin the year with a Fresh Start.  If you’ve ever felt disorganized or overwhelmed, this post is for you.  No habit or office system is written in stone.  You can make adjustments, update your practices, or create new procedures. For a kickstart, visit this blog next Monday.

BETTER CLIENT MANAGEMENT

Recommitting to marketing and client retention begins with understanding how to control and relate to clients.  Download my free eBook, Tips for Improving Client Relationships.

SHOW ME THE MONEY

Collecting fees is a battle every lawyer fights. We’ll start the new year with a deeper understanding of fee agreements, billing, and collections.

BETTER TECH FOR EVERYONE

Every year brings new tech tips, gadgets, and websites worth your time and investment. If you just can’t wait, check out 2019’s Technology Tips for Busy Legal Professionalsfeaturing workflow automation, the importance of practice management integration, better email management and document drafting with apps, ink-to-digital notebooks, specialty legal keypads, smart conference room cameras, how to create a free online business profile, ethically-compliant business texting, online contract lawyering resources, AI-powered legal research, and more.

Happy New Year!

Tumalo River

All Rights Reserved – Beverly Michaelis 2020

Last Call for Getting Paid – October 2 CLE Event

Don’t miss out on the chance to attend “Getting Paid” on Wednesday, October 2, 2019.  Learn how to talk to clients about money, incentivize clients to pay, collect accounts receivable, and modernize billing and payment practices. Designed for lawyers, legal staff, and office administrators – anyone interested in improving billing and collection practices.

When and Where

Wednesday, October 2, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Pacific Time. This is a live, online webinar.

How to Register

Click herechoose the image above, or visit the Upcoming CLE page. Secure payment processing powered by Eventbrite. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express accepted. Program materials included in the $25 registration price. Group discounts available to firms who wish to register 5 or more attendees. Contact me for more information.

Topics include

  • Identifying your fee strategy
  • Ensuring the client is invested in the case
  • Documenting and reinforcing fee discussions
  • Exploring the advantages of automated billing systems
  • Using billing descriptions clients understand
  • Making it easy for clients to pay
  • Sourcing the latest options in credit card processing and click-to-pay invoicing
  • Unbundling services to meet marketplace demands
  • Offering hybrid fee agreements
  • Getting practical about collection

Can’t Attend?

Video and audio recordings will be available to download along with the program materials shortly after the live program event.  Price: $25. Contact me or visit my online CLE store to place an order.

Don’t Miss Out!

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis

 

Client Bills Should Tell a Story

Once upon a time my lawyer sent me a billing statement I didn’t understand. The only part that wasn’t vague was the amount I owed.

If this is how clients feel about your bill, you’ve got a problem.

Billing statements should be complete, detailed, and accurate. Here are some dos and don’ts to consider:

Billing dos

  • Make the math easy to follow. If you offer early payment discounts, calculate the discount for the client. If the client is required to replenish a retainer account, show how you arrived at the replenishment number.
  • Be clear about due dates and the applicability of late charges or interest.
  • Spend client money carefully. As one writer put it, why are you FedExing correspondence to your expert when trial is six months away? The same can be said of failing to delegate work when it could have been performed just as competently for less money.
  • Put your billing practices into an easy-to-read client pamphlet. It can be on your website, in a brochure, or on a one-page sheet included with your fee agreement.
  • Proofread your bills. Mistakes drive clients crazy and cause them to question your invoice and the quality of your legal work.
  • Follow the additional tips below.

Billing don’ts

  • Don’t bill the client for anything that isn’t included in your (written) fee agreement.
  • Don’t pad your bill.
  • Don’t nickel and dime clients by billing for everyday scanning, copying, faxing, or postage. Allow for reimbursement of extraordinary expenditures by including an exception in your fee agreement, then bill accordingly.
  • Don’t raise client hackles by charging for clerical work.

What to include in your billing descriptions

  • For each billing activity include the person doing the work, the applicable rate, and the date of the activity.
  • Spell out acronyms and abbreviations like UTCR or ORCP.
  • Make your bill easier to read by ditching as much of the legalese as possible.
  • Use dynamic, results-oriented verbs to describe your work: attend, investigate, evaluate, assess, formulate. A thesaurus is your best friend.
  • Write in the present tense.
  • Always include the who, what and why:

Who

To whom did you write the email or make the call? Describe the role of the person involved – clerk of the court, opposing counsel – and include the name if it is meaningful to the client. 

What

“Review documents” is vague. Give detail! What exactly did you review? Discovery produced by the other side in response to a request for production? Say so.

Why

Explain why you took the time to perform the task. Is the trial date around the corner? Are you reviewing documents to respond to a discovery request? Give the specific reason for organizing, reviewing or preparing. This is your opportunity to tell the client that you did something worth “x” dollars and expect to be paid.

Learn more

Learn more about billing practices, collections, and how to talk to clients about money at “Getting Paid,” an online CLE event scheduled for Wednesday, October 2, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. 1.25 OSB MCLE Practical Skills credits approved. Designed for lawyers, legal staff, and office administrators – anyone interested in  improving billing and collection practices. Details available hereRegistration open now!

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis