You Can Take a Vacation

Build time off into your work schedule now to take a vacation – no excuses!  It takes some effort and organization, but your body and mind will thank you.  Three-day weekends – like Memorial Day – aren’t enough. We all need true recuperative time away from the office. This is my annual nudge to encourage you to take time from for yourself.

Budget now to go on vacation later.

“If I’m not at the office, I can’t bill.  If I can’t bill, I won’t get paid.” True enough, but there is a solution: budget for your vacation.

First, calculate your vacation expenses. Next, quantify the lost revenue you need to replace during your time out of the office. Now that you know how much you need, begin setting aside funds every week to meet your financial goal. If necessary, find little ways to cut back that can really add up: like bringing your lunch to work, deferring your daily Starbucks fix, using public transportation, or telecommuting.

Saving weekly will keep you on track and help manage expectations. If you’re just getting started, then your plans this year may be more modest. Next year, you can begin saving for your summer vacation in January.

Clients are important enough to schedule.  So is your vacation.

Work will never go away, but I guarantee that if you look ahead in your calendar you will find a block of time with no commitments. Even if you haven’t made plans yet, block the time out now before your calendar fills up. If you have a habit of backsliding, enlist your family as enforcers. If you need an extra incentive, consider non-refundable travel reservations.

Preparation is key!

If you’re a member of a firm, going on vacation is a matter of meeting with other lawyers who will be covering cases during your absence.

If you are a sole practitioner, use the buddy system.  Find a colleague who is experienced in your practice area and willing to cover for you.

This arrangement is usually reciprocal and is helpful if you have an unexpected absence from the office due to injury or a medical condition.

Vacation Checklist:

  • Notify clients, opposing counsel, judges, or other appropriate parties that you will be out of the office;
  • Prep your files.  They should be well-organized and current, with status memos so your buddy can easily step in if needed;
  • Create a “Countdown Schedule.”  Identify what needs to be done when and whether certain tasks can wait until your return;
  • Allow for wind down.  As your vacation approaches, leave time in your schedule to finish up last minute work.  Reduce or refer out new matters;
  • Train staff.  Do they have a clear understanding of office procedures?  How will they screen client calls during your absence?  Give them parameters for contacting you or your buddy in the event of an emergency.
  • Resist constantly checking voice mail, e-mail, or text messages.  Technology is a God-send, but part of rejuvenation is taking a break from our instant Internet society. Checking in is okay, but stick to a schedule to avoid obsessing over what is going on back at the office.  Remember – you have an emergency plan in place.  If something happens, staff or your buddy will get a hold of you.
  • Avoid post-vacation overload.  Just as you blocked out dates to go on vacation, allow yourself time to get back up-to-speed.  Otherwise, you’re right back where you started.

All Rights Reserved 2019 – Beverly Michaelis

 

Law Student Mental Health

New Podcast on Law Student Mental Health –

https://abacolap.wordpress.com/2019/04/25/new-podcast-on-law-student-mental-health/
— Read on abacolap.wordpress.com/2019/04/25/new-podcast-on-law-student-mental-health/

Law students may experience significant stress in law school without much to access in the way of resources. This new podcast addresses that need.

If you have students working in your office, encourage them to listen to the podcast. Point them to our own Oregon Attorney Assistance Program, which serves students in addition to lawyers.

Why Young Lawyers Should Go Solo

I’m a young lawyer. I started law school in 2010, which was a scary time to be entering the profession. Jobs had disappeared and a scarcity mindset had taken root. I was relieved when I managed to find work, first as an appellate clerk, and then at several mid-size Seattle firms. But relief and satisfaction are two very different things and, after three years in private practice, I still wasn’t satisfied with my firm job.

So, just last August, I quit and started a solo practice[…]

via 4 Reasons Young Lawyers Should Consider Going Solo — NWSidebar

Post author Mark Tyson found that going solo was the right choice for him.  Why?

You can (and will) master the business of law

You’ll have to learn, by necessity, how to write a business plan, develop a marketing strategy, create key performance indicators, track conversion rates, and so much more. You’ll make lots of mistakes and learn from them along the way.

Being a solo allows you to lead with your values

I value organizations devoted to social and cultural enrichment. To support these organizations, I incorporated a sliding-scale fee model into my pricing structure, which allows me to offer reduced rates to those who need services but can’t necessarily pay market rates.

You are free to be creative

Writing interesting and useful content has been the creative outlet I hoped to find as a lawyer… I enjoy writing, so it rarely feels like a chore to blog, especially when a new prospect calls after reading my latest, or when one of my posts hits the first page on Google.

I only help clients I truly care about

When I opened my firm, I got some advice that’s shaped my approach to marketing: “Tell at least one person a day who your ideal client is.” The directive is to be bold, yes, but also targeted in your marketing. You’re not just looking for anyone who’s willing to pay your fee—you want someone who’s a good fit for you.

Mark’s main takeaway: Starting your own firm means battling insecurity every day, but the satisfaction is well worth it.

 

Well-Being Template for Legal Employers

The Policy Committee of the ABA Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs (CoLAP) and the ABA Working Group to Advance Well-Being in the Legal Profession developed a Well-Being Template for Legal Employers to provide suggested guidelines to legal employers for responding to an employee who is experiencing impairment due to a substance use disorder, mental health disorder or […]

via New: Well-Being Template for Legal Employers — CoLAP Cafe

2019 ABA TECHSHOW – 60 Tips

It could be anything!

If you’re referring to the annual “60 in 60” tips session at the ABA TECHSHOW you are absolutely right! From useful websites to new apps, gadgets, or tools for lawyers – the content is always unpredictable.

For all the details from TECHSHOW 2019, see my full story on Wakelet. Meanwhile, here are a few of the highlights:

  • Checkli.com – free checklist maker.
  • Flow-e – email client that turns your messages into a visual (Kanban style) task board.
  • Instant tethering – use your Android phone to connect more than 45 Chrome/Android devices.
  • MileIQ – free mileage tracking that integrates with Office 365.
  • PassProtect – realtime check for potentially unsafe passwords.
  • Poll Everywhere – polling software that integrates with connected presentations, updating slides in real time as answers are texted in.
  • Rocket Book – a pen and paper notebook that saves what you write to the cloud. Erase your notes using your microwave oven when you use Pilot FriXion pens.
  • Tweet Delete – automatically delete old tweets from your Twitter account.
  • Windows 10 GodMode – If you’re sick of switching between Settings and the Control Panel or searching for your lost settings in Windows, use GodMode.

There’s so much more … like where to find a wireless “endoscope” smartphone camera to explore hard-to-reach locations.

Hopefully I’ve tempted you. Check out the complete list from 60 in 60! Where else will you learn how to enable private browsing, design better slide decks, create shortcuts for your iOS devices, find the best Chrome extensions, or access a legal keyboard with over 35 legal symbols and functions in one keystroke?

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis