Stress and Thanksgiving

You may feel there’s nothing you can do about stress.
The bills won’t stop coming, there will never be more
hours in the day, and your work and family responsibilities
will always be demanding. However, you have more
control over stress than you might think. No matter how
stressful your life seems, you can take steps to relieve
the pressure and regain balance.

Sage words from the Oregon Attorney Assistance Program.

Since Thanksgiving – and the holiday season in general – can be especially stressful, here are three stress management strategies to try:

  • Use a tool in the Stress Relief Toolbox. (Take a walk, get out in nature, listen to music, etc.) Pick an activity from the toolbox and do it. Best practices? Don’t wait for stress to build up – use one of these suggestions every day and add your favorites.
  • If you’re a list-maker, you may like the Stress Management Self-Help Checklist. It’s a good way to stay on track and remind yourself of the importance of managing stress as part of your overall health.
  • Last, but not least: if you’re trying to get a handle on the stressors in your life, consider keeping a Stress Journal.

For specific advice on how to cope with holiday expectations and holiday-related stress, review these articles from the Oregon Attorney Assistance Program:

If you’re not sure where to start, or want to talk to someone now, contact one of the attorney counselors at the Oregon Attorney Assistance Program (OAAP). Services are free and confidential.

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

See the Data Apple Has Collected on You — Via Ball in your Court

Two-and-a-half years ago, I concluded a post with this bluster: “Listen, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft and all the other companies collecting vast volumes of our data through intelligent agents, apps and social networking sites, you must afford us a ready means to see and repatriate our data. It’s not enough to let us grab snatches via an unwieldy […]

via Cloud Takeouts: Can I Get That to Go? — Ball in your Court

Meet the New Oregon Attorney Assistance Program

Well, not exactly. But meet the new OAAP website! Find events that meet your needs or speak to your interests, explore OAAP services, or learn more about the OAAP attorney counselors.

The OAAP can help with:

  • Well-being and stress
  • Anxiety or depression
  • Problem substance use
  • Compulsive and challenging behaviors
  • Career and lifestyle
  • Relationships
  • Challenging times
  • Planning for retirement

OAAP services are confidential and attorney counselors are on-call for urgent matters.

Help for yourself. Help for someone you care about.

If you are concerned about your well-being, or the well-being of another, the OAAP can help with short-term individual counseling, referral to other resources when appropriate, support groups, workshops, CLEs, and educational programs.

All Rights Reserved 2018 Beverly Michaelis

 

 

Time to begin year-end tax work

Too early to suggest working on your taxes? Absolutely not!

Once Thanksgiving hits, the rush to year-end becomes more hectic.
Start organizing your records now. Pull together and sort income and expense documentation – whether stored digitally or physically. Evaluate 2018 deductions before it’s too late. Tax questions? Call your accountant or tax preparer in the next two weeks before they’re buried by work.

To help you get started, here are some tips from the experts:

Tax preparation checklists are available from a number of public sources, including Nerd Wallet, H&R Block, TurboTax and others. The best come from your accountant or tax preparer. In either case, rely only on credible sources. For example, avoid irs.com. Remember: all government websites use the suffix .org.

Taking small steps now will ease the pain of tax return preparation later. Open your calendar and find 30 or 60 minute appointment blocks for specific tax-related tasks, like gathering records, sorting records, scanning receipts, or calling about your tax questions. You’ll be glad you did.

All Rights Reserved – Beverly Michaelis [2018]

Revisiting eFiling Tips

Are you an eFiling expert? Even so, it never hurts to refresh your memory on the
“best of” eFiling tips. Here are some from our friends at Smokeball, purveyors of law practice management software:

Use a separate and distinct eFiling email address
This ensures that important court notices won’t get buried in your unread work or personal messages.

Check your spam and junk email folders
Court mail lands here more often than you might think.

Whitelist important senders
While not full proof, this step at least offers some assurance that messages are more likely to make it to your inbox. Learn more here.

Check the online court docket
This is a simple and effective way to verify that you’ve captured important court deadlines in your calendar.

Don’t wait until the last-minute
Last-minute filings are more likely to go wrong than right. Give yourself a cushion of time to do the job right – and recover from any mistakes.

Sound familiar? I’ve made these same points many times here, in CLEs, and elsewhere. See Nuts and Bolts of Oregon eCourt and Zero Tolerance for e-Filing Error.

Are you an eFiling novice?

If so, check out the “Oregon eFiling Checklist for First Time eFiler,” on the Professional Liability Fund website. From the homepage, select Practice Management > Forms > eCourt. For a thorough overview of eCourt malpractice traps, see my 2017 CLE.

The case for Oregon eService

Read the October issue of the Oregon State Bar Bulletin featuring “The Case for Oregon eService: An Underused Asset.” If you missed the Oregon eService CLE earlier this year, consider ordering the video or audio recording. Answers to frequently asked questions may be found here.

All Rights Reserved – 2018 – Beverly Michaelis