You Can Take a Vacation

Build time off into your work schedule now to take a vacation – no excuses!  It takes some effort and organization, but your body and mind will thank you.  Three-day weekends – like Memorial Day – aren’t enough. We all need true recuperative time away from the office. This is my annual nudge to encourage you to take time from for yourself.

Budget now to go on vacation later.

“If I’m not at the office, I can’t bill.  If I can’t bill, I won’t get paid.” True enough, but there is a solution: budget for your vacation.

First, calculate your vacation expenses. Next, quantify the lost revenue you need to replace during your time out of the office. Now that you know how much you need, begin setting aside funds every week to meet your financial goal. If necessary, find little ways to cut back that can really add up: like bringing your lunch to work, deferring your daily Starbucks fix, using public transportation, or telecommuting.

Saving weekly will keep you on track and help manage expectations. If you’re just getting started, then your plans this year may be more modest. Next year, you can begin saving for your summer vacation in January.

Clients are important enough to schedule.  So is your vacation.

Work will never go away, but I guarantee that if you look ahead in your calendar you will find a block of time with no commitments. Even if you haven’t made plans yet, block the time out now before your calendar fills up. If you have a habit of backsliding, enlist your family as enforcers. If you need an extra incentive, consider non-refundable travel reservations.

Preparation is key!

If you’re a member of a firm, going on vacation is a matter of meeting with other lawyers who will be covering cases during your absence.

If you are a sole practitioner, use the buddy system.  Find a colleague who is experienced in your practice area and willing to cover for you.

This arrangement is usually reciprocal and is helpful if you have an unexpected absence from the office due to injury or a medical condition.

Vacation Checklist:

  • Notify clients, opposing counsel, judges, or other appropriate parties that you will be out of the office;
  • Prep your files.  They should be well-organized and current, with status memos so your buddy can easily step in if needed;
  • Create a “Countdown Schedule.”  Identify what needs to be done when and whether certain tasks can wait until your return;
  • Allow for wind down.  As your vacation approaches, leave time in your schedule to finish up last minute work.  Reduce or refer out new matters;
  • Train staff.  Do they have a clear understanding of office procedures?  How will they screen client calls during your absence?  Give them parameters for contacting you or your buddy in the event of an emergency.
  • Resist constantly checking voice mail, e-mail, or text messages.  Technology is a God-send, but part of rejuvenation is taking a break from our instant Internet society. Checking in is okay, but stick to a schedule to avoid obsessing over what is going on back at the office.  Remember – you have an emergency plan in place.  If something happens, staff or your buddy will get a hold of you.
  • Avoid post-vacation overload.  Just as you blocked out dates to go on vacation, allow yourself time to get back up-to-speed.  Otherwise, you’re right back where you started.

All Rights Reserved 2019 – Beverly Michaelis

 

Law Student Mental Health

New Podcast on Law Student Mental Health –

https://abacolap.wordpress.com/2019/04/25/new-podcast-on-law-student-mental-health/
— Read on abacolap.wordpress.com/2019/04/25/new-podcast-on-law-student-mental-health/

Law students may experience significant stress in law school without much to access in the way of resources. This new podcast addresses that need.

If you have students working in your office, encourage them to listen to the podcast. Point them to our own Oregon Attorney Assistance Program, which serves students in addition to lawyers.

Stress in Life and the Law

Stress in Life and the Law

Stress in Life and the Law
— Read on nwsidebar.wsba.org/2019/04/16/stress-in-life-and-the-law/

Don’t Miss Out on the Latest Tech Tips, Workflow Hacks, Apps, and Gadgets

Don’t miss out on the latest technology tips, workflow hacks, apps, and gadgets for the busy legal professional. Register now to attend Technology Tips for Busy Legal ProfessionalsDesigned for lawyers, legal staff, and office administrators – anyone interested in law office technology and automation.

Here are just a few of the topics

3 ways to automate workflows, the importance of practice management integration, better email management and document drafting with apps, ink-to-digital notebooks, specialty legal keypads, a smart conference room camera that tracks and follows speakers, creating a free online profile, ethically-compliant business texting, online contract lawyering resources, four legal research options using artificial intelligence, creating a 30-minute mission statement, rewarding referral sources, benefitting access to justice, and outsourcing in 5 minutes.

When & Where: Wednesday, May 1, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time. This is a live, online webinar.

Group Discounts: Available to firms who wish to register 5 or more attendees. Contact me for more information.

Participate in Polling & Ask Questions: Questions are welcome during the live event. Attendees are also encouraged to participate in live, anonymous polling.

How to Register

Click herechoose the image above, or visit the Upcoming CLE page. Secure payment processing powered by Eventbrite. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express accepted. Program materials included in the $25 registration price.

Can’t Attend?

Video and audio recordings will be available to download along with the program materials shortly after the live program event.  Price: $25. Contact me or visit my online CLE store to place an order.

Don’t Miss Out!

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis

 

 

All Rights Reserved 2019 Beverly Michaelis

 

Why Young Lawyers Should Go Solo

I’m a young lawyer. I started law school in 2010, which was a scary time to be entering the profession. Jobs had disappeared and a scarcity mindset had taken root. I was relieved when I managed to find work, first as an appellate clerk, and then at several mid-size Seattle firms. But relief and satisfaction are two very different things and, after three years in private practice, I still wasn’t satisfied with my firm job.

So, just last August, I quit and started a solo practice[…]

via 4 Reasons Young Lawyers Should Consider Going Solo — NWSidebar

Post author Mark Tyson found that going solo was the right choice for him.  Why?

You can (and will) master the business of law

You’ll have to learn, by necessity, how to write a business plan, develop a marketing strategy, create key performance indicators, track conversion rates, and so much more. You’ll make lots of mistakes and learn from them along the way.

Being a solo allows you to lead with your values

I value organizations devoted to social and cultural enrichment. To support these organizations, I incorporated a sliding-scale fee model into my pricing structure, which allows me to offer reduced rates to those who need services but can’t necessarily pay market rates.

You are free to be creative

Writing interesting and useful content has been the creative outlet I hoped to find as a lawyer… I enjoy writing, so it rarely feels like a chore to blog, especially when a new prospect calls after reading my latest, or when one of my posts hits the first page on Google.

I only help clients I truly care about

When I opened my firm, I got some advice that’s shaped my approach to marketing: “Tell at least one person a day who your ideal client is.” The directive is to be bold, yes, but also targeted in your marketing. You’re not just looking for anyone who’s willing to pay your fee—you want someone who’s a good fit for you.

Mark’s main takeaway: Starting your own firm means battling insecurity every day, but the satisfaction is well worth it.